A Stay at Home consultation helps you make the right choices

So your elderly mother wants to stay at home, but she can no longer drive, cook, or do the housework. You and your siblings have stressful jobs and demanding family lives, and you may or may not live within driving distance. So you bring someone in to help out. Simple, no? No, indeed! The decision to bring someone into the home of a loved one—especially a loved one who is weak or frail—can be...

We’re the best at keeping seniors happily at home

There are many choices you must make when a loved one needs help with the challenges of day-to-day living—choices not only about which service or facility to use, but also about which type of service or facility. We reviewed in an earlier post the types of help that are available when your elderly mother or father can’t take care of themselves. The choices range all the way from facilities that...

Choosing an in-home care provider: Here’s what to look for

There are many reasons to seek help from a companion care service when your loved one needs support at home. The biggest one, of course, is that you simply can’t do it yourself. Maybe you live too far away. Maybe your work and family life take up too much time. Maybe you’re physically unable to provide all the help that a loved one needs. Whatever the reason, you want to make sure that you’re...

What happens to your mom or dad after they fall?

So your elderly parent took a fall and went into the hospital. What comes next? There’s nothing we would like more than to assure you they’ll come home and get right back to life as they knew it, but that’s not how it usually works. Falls and other accidents are harder on the elderly than they are on younger people. Depending on how badly your parent is hurt and how quickly they recover, there...

We help keep discharged patients out of the hospital

If you’re a hospital administrator getting ready to release an elderly patient, then you’re asking yourself a very serious question: How do we ensure that the patient will be OK once they get home? While every case is different and every patient unique, there are general questions that will help you decide what kind of support your patient will need moving forward. We have combined these...

Stay at Home helps provide end-of-life care

We hope to have a long relationship with our clients at Stay at Home, but sometimes that’s just not in the cards. Betty George of Sevierville, Tennessee, had lived a joyful, active 86 years when she was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor. The doctors said she had at most three months to live. Betty had just entered an assisted living facility, but now it was time to come back home. She...

Let Stay at Home be Your Taxi Service

We call ourselves Stay at Home, but for one Tennessee couple the service might be called “Get Out of the House.” We’ll call them John and Mary. He’s pushing 90. We’re not going to say how old she is. John and Mary live in an assisted living facility that takes care of most all of their needs—except transportation. Their children live out of state, and they don’t want to rely on taxi service....

Stay at Home can help minimize hospital readmissions

So your mom or dad is being released from the hospital. In a very real sense, now is when the hard work begins. They could go into a nursing home, a rehabilitation center, or an assisted living facility, but what they want is to go home. Unfortunately, they’re in no position to take care of themselves, and you have a limited amount of time to put into caretaking. The challenge is a serious one....

Falls and the elderly – what we can do

Falls are a real hazard for senior citizens, but here’s the good news: They can be prevented. Risks can be minimized, and hazards can be eliminated. Recently we discussed the factors—intrinsic, extrinsic and situational—that increase fall risks for the elderly. As it turns out, there is an antidote for each. For example, To combat the loss of balance and muscle strength, you can exercise...

Falls and the elderly – why they happen

Just as the consequences of a fall become most serious, the risk of a fall becomes greatest. It may seem that the world is conspiring to make the elderly take serious falls. In fact, after the age of 65 you have a one in three chance of falling in any given year. But the risk factors for falls among the elderly are known, and they can be mitigated. The Merck Manual for Health Care Professionals...